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Coins have a long and distinguished history with religion and magic. From tithes to taxes, from pennies for the boatman, to the subtle emotional manipulation of the masses. Coins have history, all kinds of history, and they still give us direct access to the governing powers within any state.

On each of my Tables of Correspondence I have included Australian Coins I feel best serve or tap into one current or another. Coins are far more interesting and often much more flexible than a standard list, and I thought to put together something more thorough for the Australian Coins.

Australian Coinage – Obverse Design

Australian Coins Obverse - Ian Rank-Broadley (1999-present)

Australian Coins Obverse – Ian Rank-Broadley (1999-present)

All Australian coins feature the head of state, that is, Queen Elizabeth II, who also happens to be a British, European, the Head of the Commonwealth, and a women. QEII is also the Queen of Australia, and has been for some years now. There are some fine connections here to both land and ancestry for many Australians not wholly enjoyed by other New World nations. The gold and silver coins are all suitable for any working with European Ancestors, Venusian workings, tithing and appeals to Deity, especially feminine, encouraging power and strength in women, endurance, any petitioning for help with government/legal issues, and for access to the otherworlds. This last point is interesting, for me, the Queen represents the power behind the veil, she is not of Australia, however she is the head of the house that defines our government, legal and judicial systems, and much of the overarching Australian culture. The unseen power behind the world. This is a metaphoric consideration, but one that can prove useful. Her Majesty also faces to the right, which makes her useful in work that brings power into or manifests power in this world.

Australian Coinage – Reverse Design

5c Coin

1966 to present. An impression of an echidna designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

1966 to present. An impression of an echidna designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

Martial, secondary Tellurian.
The echidna’s quills make it a great avatar for defense. It is also a very quiet creature, and likes to eat things that we might otherwise fine irritating and hidden. There is something feminine about the echidna, given that it lays eggs, and has a pouch and produces milk, lives close to the ground, burrows in it, and that her name comes from the Greek and has not a wholly pleasant association. As such this coin is an excellent choice for any of the following:

  • Workings of healing that require the removal of negative influences;
  • Access to the underworlds;
  • Protection of children;
  • Any work of a martial nature especially for women;
  • Incubating or empowering spirits/imps of a Martial, or Saturnian nature;
  • Inclusion in Household protection bundles and talismans; and,
  • Inclusion in witches bottles.

10c Coin

1966 - Present An impression of a lyrebird designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

1966 – Present An impression of a lyrebird designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

Mercurial and Venusian.
As previously discussed, the Lyrebird is  suitable for both inclusion in the Venusian and Mercurial currents, without preference. You can include this coin to empower any working, water, incense, oil or bundle for any of the following:

  • Any glamour or enchantment;
  • To promote musical, or any artistic ability;
  • Attracting the opposite sex;
  • Attracting and establishing connections with helper spirits;
  • Learning something new, undertaking a course of study; and
  • Mastering Occult skills.

20c Coin

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

Mercurial, secondary Lunar.
The platypus is the creature who was several things. Duck-billed, water living, carnviore who lays eggs in a burrow and has webbed feet, claws, an otter like tail and is also venomous. Enough to kill a small dog. It is related to the echidna, and is very much like it in terms of how it reproduces, but after that, one could never tell. It is very shy, and difficult to find in the wild. Such sightings require patience. Infinitely appropriate for enlivening any of the following themed work:

  • Any work that one wishes to remain concealed;
  • Working with a new skin, that is, as offering to an animal whose form you might like to take, or would like to ride, or to enliven a constructed skin;
  • Workings against rigidity, or to encourage fluidity;
  • To promote patience;
  • To find hidden things;
  • Help with creative endeavours, or promote new ideas;
  • Movement between realms; and,
  • To encourage secrecy in self or others.

50c Coin

2010 to present. Commonwealth Coat of Arms sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2010 to present. Commonwealth Coat of Arms sculpted by Stuart Devlin

Jupiterian, undercurrents of both Martial and Saturnian.
The 50c coin is the only coin that sports the Commonwealth of Australia Coat of Arms. As such it is appropriate for any work in the Jupiterian current, for example:

  • Protection of home;
  • Prosperity (especially with land, property, work, building);
  • Endurance and persistence;
  • Appealing to greater spirits or Deity;
  • Any tithes for travel between the worlds;
  • Honouring the Ancestors; and
  • Any work to aid a legal or bureaucratic matter.

The Coat of Arms of Australia is interesting. As are most coats of arms. And infinitely full of symbols useful in all manner of workings. Included a badge of each state on a shield, a seven pointed star (The Star of Federation), on a background of Golden Wattle and the Emu and Red Kangaroo. The emu and red kangaroo are two of our largest land animals, and said to be unable to walk backwards (this is not entirely true, but a nonetheless important myth that can be utilised). I consider the red kangaroo primarily Martial, whilst the emu, Saturnian. I have since had it pointed out to me that the opposition of these two animals makes this coin particularly good for binding. Altogether with these things there are 2 crowns, two lions, two birds (one raptor, one water), St George’s Cross, Maltese Cross and the Southern Cross. Thus, the 50c coin is very flexible, drawing from European and geographical sources. You might consider it for:

  • Protection when traveling;
  • Finding something that is lost;
  • Binding curses;
  • Any work where one is attempting to assert will, or require a greater strength of will; and,
  • Influencing the will of another.

$1 Coin

2011 - Present Five kangaroos designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

2011 – Present Five kangaroos designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

Martial with a Solar undercurrent.
As I have mentioned, the Red Kangaroo is primarily Martial, and on this coin is a mob, which gives it something a bit different.  However, the first gold coin, and dollar is also Solar. You can utilise this coin for:

  • Any Martial working, protection, attack, fortitude against enemies (only remember there is nothing stealth about the nature of this coin);
  • Gathering luck;
  • Aiding, and cooperation with, others;
  • Bringing abundance; and
  • Any and all workings where one wishes to make a tithe or petition to any spirit. This is the ultimate coin for tithes and offerings of this worldly power to the otherworlds.

$2 Coin

1992-present Designed by Horst Hahne.

1992-present
Designed by Horst Hahne.

Mercurial.
This is a lovely coin, and interesting that it should be the $2 coin, since it always reminds me of the dual nature of Australia; European and Indigenous. It points to dual traditions, fused by location. This coin is excellent for the following:

  • Working with Indigenous, or native powers;
  • Gaining insight into Indigenous Dreaming Stories;
  • Mastery of Occult Arts specifically divination, reading omens, and astrological signs;
  • Honouring land as Ancestor;
  • Bringing the past together with the present in new ways;
  • Learning, especially as regards, history; and,
  • Connecting to location in a mystical way.

Obsolete Coins

1966 - 1990 A representation of a feather tailed glider designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

1966 – 1990 A representation of a feather tailed glider designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

1966 to 1989 A representation of a frilled lizard designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

1966 to 1989
A representation of a frilled lizard designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin.

Obsolete coins are always excellent for Saturnian work. In the case of these two coins, they have some individual qualities, and still can be found lurking in many households only being made obsolete since 1990.

I have listed the 2c coin as Martial, but the 1c coin with the sugar glider, I think of more as Lunar. It is also 97% copper, resonating with the Venusian current.

There are a plethora of Australian coins now obsolete. Using them may depend on what they are made of, what is sculpted on them, or the period from which they come. They might be an object link to an individual, an older or dead relative. All these considerations are relevant.

Using Coins

These are pretty versatile little objects. They can be buried in the ground, thrown into the ocean or water or over cliffs and bluffs as offerings. They can be added to any number of things, bundles, bottles, oils, waters, incense, dusts and powders and can stay there indefinitely. Besides that, a coin can be dressed and used as it’s own talisman, for either luck or protection; personal fortitude, or even a link to an animal of power. They don’t need to be of a particular currency and can serve as links to other places in the world.

All coins, as currency, have a solar nature, and any coin is good in a pinch, especially in terms of offering. But the more you can utilise the whole coin, its origin, its face, its ownership, the greater the effect in any working.

There are a great many more designs than I have considered, since coins themselves are ultimately commemorative. Coins for Anzacs, remembrance, children, royalty, anniversaries, events, great feats of ingenuity, and all manner of things. It’s always worth putting an odd coin aside that might come in handy in a future working. As any coin collector will tell you, historical, cultural fun for the whole family.

You can visit the Royal Australian Mint for more info on commemorative designs you might come across.

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